12 Best Password Managers for Business & Personal Use - Free & Paid

If you’re tired of remembering passwords for all of your online accounts and services, a password manager might be a decent choice for you!

The hassle of remembering passwords will evaporate with a password manager, allowing you to set tricky and unique passwords for every single account.

Nevertheless, we understand that not everyone has a lot of money to spend. That’s why in addition to paid services, we’ve also added the best free and secure password managers out there. As they’re known to be robust in terms of privacy and security, you can opt for these password managers without compromising your safety!

Let’s explore right now!

Table of contents

What is a password manager?

A password manager is an app designed to store and manage online credentials. Typically, these passwords are stored in an encrypted database and locked behind a master password.

What is a password manager?
What is a password manager?

A password manager generates, retrieves, and keeps track of super-long and crazy-random passwords across countless accounts for you. Meanwhile, it protects all your vital online information, including passwords, PINs, credit card numbers, three-digit CVV codes, answers to security questions, and more, with encryption so strong that it might take hackers between decades and forever to crack.

To get all that security, you only need to remember a single password, which is used to unlock your so-called vault. Your login data is locked down and, at the same time, remains right at your fingertips.

“Password managers are not a magic pill,” Lujo Bauer, an associate professor and security researcher at Carnegie Mellon University, says, “but for most users they will offer a much better combination of security and convenience than they have without them. Everyone should be using one.”

What are the common types of password managers?

Desktop-based

Desktop-based password managers store all your passwords locally on your device in an encrypted vault. You cannot access those passwords from any other device, and in case you lose the device, you’ll lose all the passwords stored there.

This type is an excellent choice for people who don’t want their data stored on someone else’s network. Some locally-installed password managers strike the right balance between convenience and privacy by allowing users to create multiple password vaults across their devices and sync them when they connect to the Internet.

Cloud-based

This type stores your encrypted passwords on the service provider’s network, and the service provider is directly responsible for the security of your passwords.

The main benefit of cloud-based password managers is that you can access your password vault from any device as long as you have an Internet connection. Web-based password managers can come in various forms, most commonly as a browser extension, desktop app, or mobile app.

Single sign-on (SSO)

Unlike password managers that store unique passwords for every app you use, SSO lets you use one password for every app.

Imagine SSO as your digital passport. When you enter a foreign country, the passport tells the officials at customs and immigration that your country of citizenship couches for you and that you should be allowed to enter with minimal hassle. Likewise, when using SSO to log in an app, you must not verify your identity. Instead, the single sign-on provider vouches for your identity.

Businesses prefer SSOs to other password manager types, mainly because it’s a secure and convenient way for employees to access the app they need to get their jobs done. SSOs can also reduce the time amount that IT spends troubleshooting and resetting forgotten passwords.

Why should you use a password manager?

During the early days of the Internet, you may have had a handful of passwords for several essential web apps that you used to study, shop, stay connected, and get work done. However, things are much more complicated today. A report from LastPass in 2017 showed that, on average, people had to remember 191 different passwords just for their work, not to mention their personal use.

Fortunately, you don’t need to remember all those passwords. A password manager is developed to:

  • Memorize all your passwords. You only have to remember the master password that unlocks your password vault. If you opt for cloud-based password manager software, you can access your password vault from any device anywhere.

  • Auto-generate highly secure passwords for you. A password manager will ask you if you would like to use an auto-generated password whenever you generate a new account with a website or app. These random passwords are alphanumeric, long, and essentially impossible to guess.

  • Save your time. In addition to just storing passwords for you, many password managers can auto-fill credentials for faster access to online accounts. Some can also keep and auto-fill name, address, phone number, email, and credit card information. This can be a huge timesaver when shopping online, for instance.

  • Sync across different operating systems. If you are a Windows user at work and a Mac user at home, jump on your iOS from Monday to Friday and turn to Android on the weekends; many password managers can help you quickly access your passwords regardless of which platform you’re on.

  • Alert you to a phishing site. Phishing is a type of scam that tricks people into giving away sensitive information. For example, spam emails are faked or spoofed to look like they come from a legitimate sender, like a family member, friend, colleague, or organization you do business with. Links included within the email direct to similarly spoofed malicious websites designed to collect login credentials. If you use a browser-based password manager, it won’t auto-complete the username and password fields because it doesn’t recognize the website as the one tied to the password.

  • Help your beneficiaries when you pass away. This is considered a digital inheritance. In the event of your death, your family, relatives, or whoever you designate to administer your estate can access your password vault.

7 best free password managers for business & personal use

1. LastPass

LastPass, a member of the LogMeIn family since 2015, is one of the best-known options for users looking for a password manager that is free and feature-rich. LastPass works well on nearly every platform and device available, though it recently dropped its macOS stand-alone app, citing significant changes in Apple’s developer tools.

LastPass
LastPass

The free version of LastPass stands out as one of the best password managers by offering you the ability to store passwords, user login information, and credentials, and sync all of it wherever you want across browser and mobile devices. The service is cloud-based only, with files saved on the company’s servers and synced to local devices.

The LastPass free plan includes the following features:

  • Access on all devices
  • Save and fill passwords
  • One-to-one sharing
  • Password generator
  • Secure notes
  • Security challenge
  • Multi-factor authentication
  • Security Dashboard

These features make LastPass one of the most well-rounded free password managers nowadays, which is ideal for anyone who wants an easy solution that works with practically no learning curve.

If you’d like to explore more advanced features, you can upgrade to LastPass’ subscription plans. For $36 per year, you can purchase the Premium version to share passwords, logins, memberships, and other items with trusted people, use advanced multi-factor authentication options and get 1GB of encrypted storage.

With a $48 annual subscription, you can sign up for the Families plan, which gives you six individual accounts, shared folders, and a dashboard to manage the family accounts and keep an eye on your account’s security.

However, LastPass isn’t flawless. A 2019 vulnerability privately reported revealed a scary flaw that could potentially compromise passwords. But the company quickly patched it before it was exploited in the wild. Overall though, LastPass is a good choice for those on a tight budget.

2. NordPass

If NordPass sounds familiar, that’s probably because you’ve heard of NordVPN, the flagship VPN (Virtual Private Network) product from this mysterious company. Except for the Nordic-root name, the website doesn’t list its founders, executives, or key technical personnel. Even its LinkedIn page is sparse.

NordPass
NordPass

NordPass uses a zero-knowledge setup in which all data is encrypted in your device before it is uploaded to the company’s servers. The company also recently introduced a personal data storage feature to keep your address, phone number, as well as other personal data safe and secure, but very easy to access.

In addition, NordPass protects customer passwords with the XChaCha20 algorithm, the same encryption that Google uses to keep their data secure. Plus, the company includes biometric logins, so users can log into their password vault using only their fingerprint.

The NordPass free plan includes the following features:

  • Save unlimited passwords
  • Keep notes and credit cards
  • Sync across all devices
  • Only 1 active device

There is a seven-day free trial period of the premium version, which allows you to test excellent features, including the use of 6 devices with cloud sync. But to get that for good, you’ll need to upgrade to the $36-per-annual plan.

3. Dashlane

Dashlane might not have the longevity of its chief competitors, but it has been around long enough to earn a reputation for ease of use and security.

Dashlane
Dashlane

It provides a simple and secure way to manage your passwords and other login information. It protects user credentials using military-grade AES-256-bit encryption and stores them locally. The Dashlane app also doubles up as a useful digital wallet to store debit cards, credit cards, and other payment details. It has a dedicated interface to change different passwords with ease.

The Dashlane free plan includes the following features:

  • 1 device
  • 50 passwords
  • Form and payment autofill
  • Securely share to 5 accounts
  • Personalized security alerts
  • Two-factor authentication

The Free plan is basically a trial version of Premium plans. While the free version is good, we’d recommend most users spend a few bucks per month and get the paid version to unlock all of Dashlane’s excellent features. The Premium plans remove limits on the number of saved passwords and synced devices and include a VPN option.

4. RoboForm

RoboForm celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2020, which makes it practically a senior company compared to some of its rivals. It is the one blessed with a clean and neat interface and great looks. As a part of its multi-platform support, it’s available for Windows 10, macOS, Android, and iOS, as well as all major browsers.

RoboForm
RoboForm

The free version of RoboForm stores its credentials database locally, meaning you are responsible for backing up that data and syncing it manually among devices. In addition, it offers various attractive features, such as:

  • Unlimited logins
  • Fills forms
  • Password generator
  • Password audit

The RoboForm Everywhere plan is a $24-per-annual subscription service that adds cloud backup, sync, and two-factor authentication features. It also includes a secure folder and the ability to designate a trusted contact to get emergency access to your saved passwords in the event of serious illness or death (this option can function as a form of password recovery).

The Family plan ($48 per year) covers up to five users, while the Business plan costs $35 per user per year. Discounts are available for multi-year purchases.

5. Sticky Password

Sticky Password was created in 2001 by former executives of AVG Technologies, which was a pioneer in the freemium field for security software. Particularly true to their roots, this password manager offers a full-featured free version working on all major device categories and browsers.

Sticky Password
Sticky Password

The Sticky Password Free version offers unlimited storage on unlimited devices, but it doesn’t sync between devices, which is a significant convenience. However, Sticky Password provides a few unique features that make it a compelling choice, including:

  • Automatic form-filling and autologin
  • Superstrong password generator
  • Secure notes
  • Two-factor authentication
  • Biometric logins
  • USB portable version (Windows)

In addition to credentials, Sticky Password can also store user’s payment details. One outstanding feature that the creators of Sticky Password promote with enthusiasm is that it can sync data across WiFi locally, in case some users don’t want to do it over the cloud.

The $30-per-annual premium version includes the ability to sync between devices, using either a local-only option using your own Wi-Fi network or the company’s server. It also supports secure password sharing and cloud backups and includes priority support. If you are really committed to the service, you can buy a lifetime subscription for $200.

6. LogMeOnce

LogMeOnce’s feature list is a little bit overwhelming, but if you are looking for extreme customizability, perhaps it should be on your shortlist. Even with its free plan, LogMeOnce gives more benefits than many other password managers.

LogMeOnce
LogMeOnce

The free, ad-supported version of LogMeOnce offers:

  • Unlimited passwords
  • Unlimited devices & sync
  • Unlimited autofill
  • Password generator
  • Password calculator
  • Save up to 3 credit cards
  • 5 secure password sharing
  • 3 secure notes
  • 2-factor authentication
  • Apps beneficiary
  • 1MB encrypted storage
  • Email technical support

Upgrading to a subscription plan at $30 or $39 per annual removes the ads and the storage limits, as well as unlocks extra features like a customizable dashboard and a security feature that snaps a mugshot of anyone that tries to hack into your account on a stolen device. Team, business, enterprise, and managed service provider options are available as well.

7. KeePass

If you insist on open-source software or you’re cloud-phobic, this is your option. KeePass is an excellent open-source Windows desktop password manager, but it is also available for Linux and macOS.

KeePass
KeePass

As KeePass is an open-source service, the code can be verified by any security professional. And you can gain full control of your passwords because it provides end-to-end encryption. KeePass stores usernames and passwords offline on the user’s device in an encrypted file. It supports the import and export of credentials in the form of HTML, XML, CSV, etc. files.

Files are stored locally, and you will want to master its arcane keyboard shortcuts to automatically fill in passwords. Browser integration is available via 3rd-party plugins; for multi-device use, the program’s built-in sync engine updates the password database in whatever cloud-based storage location you specify automatically.

Its feature set is quite limited when compared to other choices for the best password managers included in this list. However, KeePass supports some following basic features:

  • Combination of the master password and key file
  • No installation required
  • Option to create password groups
  • Plugins to extend functionalities

5 best-paid password managers for business & personal use

8. 1Password

1Password began life as an Apple-centric solution, but it’s since broadened its offerings to include Windows, ChromeOS, iOS, and Android. There are also available plug-ins for your favorite web browser, making it easy to create and edit new passwords on the fly.

1Password
1Password

What makes 1Password outstanding is the number of extras it provides. In addition to managing your passwords, it can act as an authentication app. And for added security, it generates a secret key to the encryption key it uses, which means no one can decrypt your passwords without that key (However, the downside is that if you lose the key, no one, not even 1Password, can decrypt your passwords).

Furthermore, 1Password can integrate tightly with other mobile apps. Instead of copying and pasting passwords from your password manager to other apps, it is integrated with many apps and can autofill.

1Password offers a 30-day free trial, so you can test it out before committing. Let’s explore 1Password’s pricing plans and main features:

Pricing plan Price Features
Personal Free $0 - 15 passwords
- Secure sharing
- Browser extension
- Autofill & autosave
- Mobile app
Personal Premium €2.50/ month Everything in the Personal Free plan, plus:
- Unlimited passwords
- Tags
Teams €3.5/ month Everything in the Personal Premium plan, plus:
- Team management
- Unlimited guests
Enterprise Custom price Everything in the Teams plan, plus:
- On-premises setup
- Secure environment
- Training and support

9. F-Secure KEY

F-Secure KEY works well with a wide range of platforms and devices, including laptops, tablets, and smartphones.

F-Secure KEY
F-Secure KEY

In order to protect user credentials against unauthorized access, F-Secure KEY uses military-grade 256-bit AES-encryption and supports the use of biometric authentication, using a unique identifier to verify a user’s identity before allowing access to any accounts. The built-in password highlights potential security flaws, which alert users when their passwords are not strong enough to resist brute-force attacks by hackers.

F-Secure KEY also offers an automatic form-filling feature, which helps save users’ time when they log in to websites and mobile apps. In addition, it includes a secure password generator and automatic syncing across different devices. However, F-Secure KEY doesn’t offer password sharing.

When it comes to price, F-Secure KEY offers only one paid version of €29.90 per year for unlimited password storage.

10. PassCamp

The Lithuanian development team behind PassCamp password manager has an unusual story. They couldn’t find an off-the-shelf password manager that suited their team’s needs, so they decided to build their own.

PassCamp
PassCamp

PassCamp offers most of the checklist features of its competitors, including secure sharing. The company also provides a blockchain-based history log that can track every change or share of every item in the repository, and the ability to distribute passwords and assign permissions for it.

Pricing plan Price Features
Personal Free $0 - 15 passwords
- Secure sharing
- Browser extension
- Autofill & autosave
- Mobile app
Personal Premium €2.50/ month Everything in the Personal Free plan, plus:
- Unlimited passwords
- Tags
Teams €3.5/ month Everything in the Personal Premium plan, plus:
- Team management
- Unlimited guests
Enterprise Custom price Everything in the Teams plan, plus:
- On-premises setup
- Secure environment
- Training and support

11. Hypervault

This relatively new product, first released in late 2018, was originally designed for internal use by its developers. One year later, Version 2 was launched, which delivered on some of the company’s promises to focus on teams’ need. The v2 includes group permissions, a revamped UI, and a rights-based structure for team members.

Hypervault
Hypervault

The company provides a well-documented changelog and roadmap, as well as a self-hosted version listed as “coming soon.” Its pricing starts at $2.50 per user per month, with discounts kicking in at the 10-user and 50-user thresholds and additional discounts for yearly purchases.

You can try Hypervault with all of its features for free during its 7-day free trial period. You can up- and downgrade during the period without getting billed.

12. Keeper

Last but not least, to end this list of best password managers, we’ve got Keeper. The first thing we love about this popular password vault is the user interface that we guess is one of the best in the entire line-up.

Keeper
Keeper

All options are arranged neatly in a pane on the left, and clicking any one of them will reveal the settings. But one thing that needs improvement is it should label what features are paid. You can only realize this once you try to use a feature, and it wants your money.

Both the web and desktop versions of the Keeper app look almost the same. You can quickly add login credentials to a record that also includes photos. Like other password managers, Keeper is available for Windows, macOS, iOS, Android, Linux, and extensions for different web browsers.

Since 2011, Keeper has developed a wild assortment of products, with separate offerings for personal and family use, business, enterprise customers, and managed service providers. Below are Keeper’s pricing plans and their special features:

Pricing plan Price Features
Business $3.75/ user/month ($45 billed annually) - Encrypted vault for every user
- Folders and subfolders
- Shared team folders
- Access from unlimited devices
- Policy engine and enforcements
- Security Audit
- Activity reporting
- Team management
- Basic 2-factor authentication
Enterprise $5/ user/ month ($60 billed annually) Everything in Business plan, plus:
- SSO authentication
- Automated team management
- Advanced 2-factor authentication
- Active directory and LDAP sync
- SCIM and Azure AD provisioning
- Email auto-provisioning
- Command-line provisioning
- Developer APIs for password rotation and backend integration
Personal Keeper Unlimited $2.91/ month ($34.99 billed annually) - Unlimited password storage
- Unlimited identity & payments
- Fingerprint & face ID login
- Unlimited devices & sync
- Secure record sharing
- Emergency access
- Web application
- 24/7 support
Keeper Plus Bundle $4.87/ month ($58.46 billed annually) Everything in Keeper Unlimited plan, plus:
- BreachWatch dark web monitoring
- Secure File Storage
Keeper Max Bundle $6.01/ month ($72.22 billed annually) Everything in Keeper Plus Bundle, plus:
KeeperChat private messenger
Family Keeper Family $6.24/ month ($74.99 billed annually) - 5 private vaults
- 10GB secure file storage
- Unlimited password storage
- Unlimited identity & payments
- Web app
- Fingerprint & face ID
- Unlimited devices & sync
- Secure record sharing
- Emergency access
- 24/7 support
Keeper Family Plus Bundle $8.62/ month ($103.48 billed annually) Everything in the Keeper Family plan, plus:
- BreachWatch dark web monitoring
- Secure file storage
Keeper Family Max Bundle $12.39/ month ($148.72 billed annually) Everything in Keeper Family Plus Bundle, plus:
KeeperChat private messenger
Student 50% off of the listed prices - Autofill passwords
- Identity & payment info
- Custom fields
- Secure file storage
- Emergency access
- 2-factor authentication
- Securely share information
- Version history

The bottom line

If you’re among the people who often forget passwords and end up creating multiple accounts on the same website, a password manager is made for you. In reality, there’s no harm in using a password manager even if you have a great memory recalling.

The need of password managers won’t go away anytime soon, at least, not until we enter into a password-less future aided by Web Authentication - a new standard that allows people to use their face, eyes, fingerprint, etc. to authenticate online services.

We hope that our list of 12 best password managers for business & person (free & paid) will help you a lot. If you used to try any other useful password managers, you could share it with us! We’re always happy to hear from you!

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